Megan Khang clings to 1-stroke lead at Portland Classic

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South Korea’s Hyo Joon Jang shot a blistering 62 to move within one shot of leader Megan Khang after three rounds of the Portland Classic on Saturday in Portland, Ore.

Khang shot a third consecutive 66 to sit 18-under-par 198 in her bid for wins in consecutive weeks. Khang won her first career tourney at last week’s CPKC Women’s Open.

But it was the round of Jang that highlighted Saturday’s action. She finished with 11 birdies, tying the LPGA record for the second most in a round. Jang had recorded only one round in the 60s this year before shooting three consecutive sub-60 rounds in Portland.

“Let’s say speechless,” Jang said when asked to describe her round.

Jang recently underwent back surgery.

“Still I am going through a lot of things and there is a lot coming, so I won’t say it’s (the) end, but it’s something that’s going to be meaningful for my stepstone. … I wasn’t playing much this year but I’m going to play more, so I’m more excited in the future,” Jang said.

Jang is tied with Chanettee Wannasaen for second. Wannasaen carded a 65 on Saturday.

Carlota Ciganda (third round 66) sits at 15 under in fourth, three shots back. Another four players are in a tie for fifth at 14 under, four shots off the lead.

Khang started slow, posting two birdies on the front with a bogey. But then she posted five birdies coming in, including three straight on Holes 11-13.

“Overall I had such a good feeling with my putter today. Was such a solid stroke,” Khang said. “But honestly, on the back nine, I had a couple lip in and I was like, ‘Wow, I thought I missed it for sure and I got very fortunate to get the opposite and have it lip in.’ So for me, it’s just kind of like I was really happy the way I was stroking it today and I’m really hoping I can carry that into tomorrow.”

Khang said she learned something from her first win.

“My dad always told me that you can only control what you can control. Don’t really get too preoccupied with what everyone else is doing. At the end of the day you can’t control what they’re doing, so just stay in your own little world, do your own little thing, and try your best to take care of every little thing that you can make better for yourself instead of stress me out about what other people are doing,” Khang said.